4 reasons why you need a serger.

Can’t make up your mind on whether to add a serger to your sewing machine collection? Here are 4 signs to help you decide:

Do you sew mostly garments?

Let’s face it, unfinished garment seams, especially on woven fabrics, aren’t durable over time. Eventually the fabric will fray, showing the unfinished edges and sometimes your seams will start to unravel. (That’s the beginning of the end for your handmade garment!)

If you look at your store-bought clothes you will most likely notice the flawless edge of the seams. This is where the brilliant work of an overlocker comes into play – it stitches and trims away excess fabric along the edge all at once!

The serger can be set up to complete many finishes by simply adjusting the settings to suit your project. Investing in a serger will make your garments stand the test of time, while making them look professionally constructed.

Do you have limited time to sew?

Granted, not all of us are full-time home sewists. Some of us are lucky if we can have an uninterrupted stitching session while the kiddos are napping, or manage to sew straight after getting home from our full-time job. If your sewing time is limited, a serger can help you whiz through your projects quickly and efficiently.

A serger can be used for many finishes including construction of garments, through to finishing off the edges of fabric that will then be seamed on the sewing machine. In particular, the serger is useful for knit and stretch fabrics, as it helps to guide and seam these fabrics that are often difficult to sew using a sewing machine.

THE FABULOUS JANOME AIR THREAD 2000D SERGER

Do you have trouble with the edges of your seamed fabrics rolling after sewing with the sewing machine?

Does the fabric rolling in the seam allowance on the edge of your knit garment drive you batty? If you have experienced this before, you will know that it becomes difficult to sew other intersecting seams and creates an unnecessary bulk to your work.

Sergers can help with this issue as the knit/stretch fabrics feed through with the help of the differential feed and allow you to create a nice flat seam allowance. Your waistbands and side seams will look a lot neater and sit more comfortably when you wear your garment.

Do you enjoy sewing home décor or accessorizing your home?

The serger can be used for more than just garment sewing. Have you ever wanted to work with fabrics that might end up needing to be washed or used frequently, and you worry about how they will cope?

The serger can be perfect for this as you can finish the edges of your pillows and other home dec. items so that they are reinforced and secure for laundering and daily use. With a serger, you can stitch up lovely rolled hems to finish off your table linens, gathers for beautiful ruffles on pillows and so much more! The extra strength that is given when using the serger on the seams allows for a longer life to your handmade sewing projects.

One thing is for sure, once you decide to invest in a serger, it quickly becomes very difficult to imagine life without it! A serger can be the perfect addition for everyone. Contact an authorised Janome dealer today for a demonstration on the range of Janome sergers to see how much your sewing experience can be improved with this versatile machine.

Information courtesy of Janome Australia

About lizafrica

I am the National Education Manager for Janome & Elna Canada (including Artistic Creative products) and I LOVE to sew! I have been employed full time in the sewing and quilting industry for almost 30 years so I bring a wealth of sewing knowledge & expertise to this blog. I enjoy all forms of sewing from quilting to sewing garments to machine embroidery and software. Pretty much everything in my life is seen through the eyes of a passionate sewer! I am constantly on the look out for fun, innovative and inspiring ideas to share with you all on this blog. I also love to read, knit , travel and spend time with my family and friends.
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