Experimenting with Janome’s NEW 9mm Narrow Piping Foot (I2)

Last year my Mum politely asked me to recover some pillows for her. I love her so I said yes. In fact, I love her soooooo much that I made pillows with zippers AND piping. That my friends, is a lot of love. She is a fantastic Mum so she does deserve all the love.

Photo credit to my (Amanda) Mum Nancy!

Janome’s Piping Foot (1) Part Number 202088004 was a dream for making and attaching the piping to these pillows. Imagine how excited I was to learn that Janome now has a NEW Narrow Piping Foot (I2) for 9mm machines! Part Number 202462006. This foot is made for 2mm cord and smaller.

Have I ever told you that I went University and College for Science and Environmental Sciences? I sure did. I thought this would be a great time to break out my experimenting skills to put these 2 presser feet to the test. Please note I have been out of this industry for almost 15 years so my science skills are rusty and this experiment probably wouldn’t hold up to a peer reviewed journal standards, lol!

If you are new to a Piping Foot and want an in-depth look at how they work check out this link for some great blog posts. Both the Janome Piping Foot and the Janome Narrow Piping foot work the exact same way. 

Question: Between the Piping Foot (I) and the Narrow Piping Foot (I2) which one will suit your sewing needs?

Tools: On the left we have the NEW Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2) and on the right we have the original regular Janome Piping Foot (I).

Please note both are for 9mm machines. There is an original regular Janome Piping Foot (I) for 7mm machines, Part Number  200314006. The top of each presser foot looks fairly similar except the Narrow Piping Foot (I2) has a groove down the middle marking the centre of the foot.

Notice below the difference in the sizes of the grooves on the bottom of the presser feet. The top is the regular Janome Piping Foot (I) and the channels underneath are much larger than the channels on the Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2).

Top: Janome Piping Foot (I)
Bottom: Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2)

Experiment 1: 2mm Cord with Thin Fabrics

With the Janome Piping Foot (I) there are a few issues which pop up with this combo. The channel of the foot is so big that the cording moves around, so its hard to get an even line of stitching. The piping was moving further away from the needle as I stitched and the needle hole on the top only allows you to move the needle over so far.

In the photos above, you will see on the left the Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2) where the needle position can get really tight to the cord. In the photo on the right the original Janome Piping Foot (I) the needle is much farther away from the cord. In the photo below the original Janome Piping Foot (I) was used to stitch the top sample of piping, and the stitching is quite far from the cord. The bottom sample of piping was stitched using the NEW Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2) and I still could have gotten the stitches a little closer to the piping by moving the needle over a notch or two to the right.

Top: Janome Piping Foot (I)
Bottom: NEW Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2)

Experiment 2: 5mm Cord with Upholstery Fabric.

Try not to laugh too hard at the photos below. You can easily see that the photo on the right with the Janome Piping Foot (I) accommodates this piping with ease. The NEW Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2) on the left, however, is a disaster. You might as well just sew with your normal Zig-Zag Foot (A) or Zipper Foot (E) at this point.

The results in the finished piping really seals the deal on this one. The Janome Piping Foot (I) on the top looks well defined and secure. The NEW Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2) has given us uneven piping and where it looks like the piping is sitting really nicely on the right, I’ve actually sewed over the cord and the cord is below the stitch line. The presser foot is simply too small for this size of cording!

Top: Janome Piping Foot (I)
Bottom: Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2)

Experiment 3: 3mm Cord and Quilting Cotton

I love this one! Both the regular and narrow Piping Feet work really well with this set up. Left is the Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2) and on the right is the Janome Piping Foot (I). I felt like I could get the stitching nice and close with either of these feet.

One thing to keep in mind in this scenario, though, the NEW Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2) may be perfect for making the piping, but as you add more layers when you sandwich your piping in between layers of other fabric, the narrow channels may not accommodate the fabric as well. In this scenario you could absolutely use your zipper foot or if you have the regular Janome Piping Foot (I) you could switch over to that.

Top: Janome Piping Foot (I)
Bottom: NEW Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2)

Experiment 4: How tiny can you go with the NEW Janome Narrow Piping Foot (I2)?

Teeny Tiny! That finished piping is just under 2mm!! This will be perfect for any fine detail piping you may want to add to clothing, bags, quilts or projects around your house!

Conclusion:

Both these presser feet are amazing for making and attaching piping to your projects. The channels on the bottom really hold the cording and fabric secure and give you a nice finish, making all your projects look professional.

Which Janome Piping Foot that will be perfect for your projects really depends on your fabrics and what size your cording is. Any cord 3mm or larger, or when using any heavy fabric, you will want to use the regular Janome Piping Foot (I). For cords smaller than 3mm and for lighter weight fabric you will want the NEW Janome Piping Foot (I2). Or maybe you just need both!

Stitch On!

AmandaBee

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2 Responses to Experimenting with Janome’s NEW 9mm Narrow Piping Foot (I2)

  1. Sharon Anne Schaus says:

    Thanks for the info

    Like

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